Last updated 9 August 2016

When consumers have electricity or gas connected, they enter into a contract with the energy provider. The contracts must comply with the National Energy Retail Rules and the Australian Consumer Law.

The Australian Government provides information for Queensland consumers about comparative electricity tariffs. Pension discounts are not taken into account.

The Queensland Council of Social Service also has consumer factsheets on energy contracts.

The Australian Consumer and Competition Commission and the Office of Fair Trading have advice about energy contracts including solar contracts for consumers. Energy suppliers are obliged to have hardship policies.

Consumers, who would like to make a complaint should contact the energy supplier first and give a reasonable opportunity to resolve the complaint before contacting the Energy and Water Ombudsman (the Energy Ombudsman) for assistance.

The Energy Ombudsman can assist with a wide variety of disputes including account disputes, disconnections, service guarantees and debt collection.

Once a complaint is made, an investigation takes place and negotiation or mediation may follow. If the matter is not resolved, the Energy Ombudsman can determine the matter with a decision that binds the energy supplier.

If the Energy Ombudsman cannot assist, consumers can take action in the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal.